Tuesday, 27 February 2024 00:00

When you stub your toe, the immediate pain and discomfort can be intense. Distinguishing between a minor injury and a more serious condition is essential for appropriate treatment. The first thing to do is to observe the toe for signs of trauma such as swelling, bruising, or deformity. Minor swelling and discomfort are common after stubbing your toe and usually subside with time. However, if the pain is severe and persists beyond a few hours, or if you notice significant swelling or bruising, it may indicate a more severe injury such as a fracture or dislocation. Pay attention to changes in movement and sensation as well, and if you find it difficult to move the toe or experience numbness or tingling, it could signify nerve damage or a more serious injury. Additionally, if the toe appears misaligned or if you notice an open wound, seek medical attention promptly. If you have stubbed your toe, and are experiencing persistent pain or discomfort, it is suggested that you consult a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and treatment.

Toe pain can disrupt your daily activities. If you have any concerns, contact Dr. Douglas Mckay of New Jersey . Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Causes Toe Pain?

Most severe toe pain is caused due to a sports injury, trauma from dropping something heavy on the toe, or bumping into something rigid. Other problems can develop over time for various reasons.

Toe pain can be caused by one or more ailments. The most common include:

  • Trauma
  • Sports injury
  • Wearing shoes that are too tight
  • Arthritis
  • Gout
  • Corns and calluses
  • Hammertoe
  • Bunions
  • Blisters
  • Ingrown toenails
  • Sprains
  • Fractures (broken bones)
  • Dislocations

When to See a Podiatrist

  • Severe pain
  • Persistent pain that lasts more than a week
  • Signs of infection
  • Continued swelling
  • Pain that prevents walking

Diagnosis

In many cases the cause of toe pain is obvious, but in others, a podiatrist may want to use more advanced methods to determine the problem. These can range from simple visual inspections and sensation tests to X-rays and MRI scans. Prior medical history, family medical history, and any recent physical traumatic events will all be taken into consideration for a proper diagnosis.

Treatment

Treatments for toe pain and injuries vary and may include shoe inserts, padding, taping, medicines, injections, and in some cases, surgery. If you believe that you have broken a toe, please see a podiatrist as soon as possible.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Caldwell, and Galloway, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Toe Pain
Tuesday, 20 February 2024 00:00

Ingrown toenails can become chronic if left untreated. Causes can include improper nail trimming, wearing tight footwear, obesity, trauma, excessive sweating, fungal infections, and hormonal changes. Symptoms encompass pain, swelling, redness, and pus formation. Classification into three stages guides treatment decisions, with conservative measures recommended for mild cases. Conservative approaches include proper nail trimming, wearing roomy shoes, and using gauze or specialized materials to separate the nail from the flesh. Surgical intervention becomes necessary for stages two and three, involving either partial or total nail removal and destruction of the lateral matrix to prevent regrowth. Regular podiatry care and adherence to post-treatment protocols are necessary for successful management of ingrown toenails. If you have repeated experience with ingrown toenails, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist for an evaluation of the stage you are experiencing, in addition to obtaining proper treatment.

Ingrown toenails may initially present themselves as a minor discomfort, but they may progress into an infection in the skin without proper treatment. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact Dr. Douglas Mckay of New Jersey . Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails are caused when the corner or side of a toenail grows into the soft flesh surrounding it. They often result in redness, swelling, pain, and in some cases, infection. This condition typically affects the big toe and may recur if it is not treated properly.

Causes

  • Improper toenail trimming
  • Genetics
  • Improper shoe fitting
  • Injury from pedicures or nail picking
  • Abnormal gait
  • Poor hygiene

You are more likely to develop an ingrown toenail if you are obese, have diabetes, arthritis, or have any fungal infection in your nails. Additionally, people who have foot or toe deformities are at a higher risk of developing an ingrown toenail.

Symptoms

Some symptoms of ingrown toenails are redness, swelling, and pain. In rare cases, there may be a yellowish drainage coming from the nail.

Treatment

Ignoring an ingrown toenail can have serious complications. Infections of the nail border can progress to a deeper soft-tissue infection, which can then turn into a bone infection. You should always speak with your podiatrist if you suspect you have an ingrown toenail, especially if you have diabetes or poor circulation.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Caldwell, and Galloway, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Ingrown Toenails
Tuesday, 13 February 2024 00:00

The feet, intricate structures that are comprised of numerous bones and muscles, play a vital role in mobility and stability. Among the key bones are the tarsals, metatarsals, and phalanges, forming the arches and providing support for the body's weight. Ligaments connect these bones, offering stability and flexibility during movement. The muscles of the feet, categorized into intrinsic and extrinsic groups, facilitate intricate movements necessary for walking, running, and balancing. Intrinsic muscles, found within the foot, control fine movements of the toes and arches, while extrinsic muscles, originating in the lower leg, aid in broader movements such as dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. Together, these muscles and bones work harmoniously to absorb shock, distribute pressure, and maintain proper alignment during various activities. Understanding the anatomy and function of the feet is essential for preventing injuries and optimizing performance in everyday tasks and physical activities. By nurturing foot health through wearing proper footwear, stretching, and strengthening exercises, individuals can ensure the longevity and functionality of their feet for years to come. If you would like additional information about how the bones and muscles in the feet work in harmony, it is suggested that you consult a podiatrist who can provide you with the knowledge you are seeking.

If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Dr. Douglas Mckay from New Jersey . Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Biomechanics in Podiatry

Podiatric biomechanics is a particular sector of specialty podiatry with licensed practitioners who are trained to diagnose and treat conditions affecting the foot, ankle and lower leg. Biomechanics deals with the forces that act against the body, causing an interference with the biological structures. It focuses on the movement of the ankle, the foot and the forces that interact with them.

A History of Biomechanics

  • Biomechanics dates back to the BC era in Egypt where evidence of professional foot care has been recorded.
  • In 1974, biomechanics gained a higher profile from the studies of Merton Root, who claimed that by changing or controlling the forces between the ankle and the foot, corrections or conditions could be implemented to gain strength and coordination in the area.

Modern technological improvements are based on past theories and therapeutic processes that provide a better understanding of podiatric concepts for biomechanics. Computers can provide accurate information about the forces and patterns of the feet and lower legs.

Understanding biomechanics of the feet can help improve and eliminate pain, stopping further stress to the foot.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Caldwell, and Galloway, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Biomechanics in Podiatry
Tuesday, 06 February 2024 00:00

Each toe consists of two or three small and delicate bones that are susceptible to fractures, commonly caused by incidents like stubbing your toe or heavy object impacts. Most broken toes can be managed without surgery and treated conservatively. However, severe injuries include situations where the toe becomes crooked, there is an open wound, or if it involves the big toe, necessitating care from a podiatrist. In cases involving the big toe, casting or splinting may be required for healing, with occasional surgery if bone fragments disrupt proper healing. Symptoms of a broken toe include pain, swelling, stiffness, and bruising lasting up to two weeks. Crooked toes may need realignment, either with or without surgery. Initial symptom relief involves rest, elevation, and pain relievers. Buddy taping and wearing appropriate footwear can assist healing, with gradual resumption of activity once swelling subsides. If you have broken your toe and you have concerning symptoms, such as numbness, increased pain or swelling, open wounds, fever, slow healing, or unusual discoloration, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist as quickly as possible for treatment.

Broken toes may cause a lot of pain and should be treated as soon as possible. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Dr. Douglas Mckay from New Jersey . Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Is a Broken Toe?

A broken toe occurs when one or more of the toe bones of the foot are broken after an injury. Injuries such as stubbing your toe or dropping a heavy object on it may cause a toe fracture.

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

  • Swelling
  • Pain (with/without wearing shoes)
  • Stiffness
  • Nail Injury

Although the injured toe should be monitored daily, it is especially important to have a podiatrist look at your toe if you have severe symptoms. Some of these symptoms include worsening or new pain that is not relieved with medication, sores, redness, or open wounds near the toe.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Caldwell, and Galloway, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about What to Know About a Broken Toe

Connect With Us